Sunday, 21 August 2016

Introductions And Hard Work

Historical fiction can be a good introduction to a historical period. I read about the Scipios at the Battle of Ticinus in Poul Anderson's Guardians Of Time before I read about them in Latin at school. Think about how many historical periods are covered in Anderson's works.

Similarly, a screen adaptation can be a good introduction to a novel. I can quote two good examples of that but neither of them comes from Poul Anderson because his works have not been filmed as yet.

I can no longer read Anderson for relaxation because I am continually seeking blogging material and this is mental work; entirely self-motivated but work nevertheless. Being tired from a late night and a busy day, I do not want to tackle Chapter 17 of Operation Luna as yet, although page viewers are welcome to read ahead and comment with spoilers. For relaxation before turning in, I instead reread The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo by Stieg Larsson, another endlessly fascinating work. See here.

Similarities to and differences from Poul Anderson. All the better.

7 comments:

  1. Kaor, Paul!

    I immediately thought of Peter Jackson's filmed adaptations of JRR Tolkien's THE HOBBIT and THE LORD OF THE RINGS as two of the possibilities you had in mind of novels turned into movies. Filmed adaptations of the Narnian books and the Harry Potter stories also came to mind.

    And I wish some film producer or director would take a chance with one of Poul Anderson's works! How badly or well would a filmed version of "The Game of Glory" be done? I've suggested the Bahamas might be a good location for such a movie.

    Sean

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    1. Sean,
      My daughter, Aileen, very young, saw an American TV animation of THE LION, THE WITCH AND THE WARDROBE. Shortly after, in great excitement, she told me, "Paul, do you know what Sheila's got? Some books of THE LION, The WITCH AND THE WARDROBE!"
      I saw THE FIRM with Tom Cruise and Gene Hackman on TV late on a Saturday night. The following morning, I found the paperback at a car boot sale.
      Paul.

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    2. Kaor, Paul!

      Interesting! Meaning you and your daughter very quickly found copies of the books the movies they watched were based on?

      Sean

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    3. Sean,
      No. I had read CS Lewis, including Narnia, in my teens. I bought a boxed set for Sheila before Aileen was born. Thus, it was Aileen who first encountered Narnia on TV.
      The usual way to encounter Narnia is in childhood but for me it was in my teens as one part of Lewis' works.
      Paul.

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    4. Kaor, Paul!

      Darn! I completely misunderstood you! (Smiles)

      I fear I never did "get into" the Narnia books. They seemed too young for me!

      Sean

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    5. Sean,
      I was unusual in reading them in my teens. To me, they only seemed young in the opening sentences.
      Paul.

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    6. Kaor, Paul!

      Alas, I only read THE LION, THE WITCH, AND THE WARDROBE when I was already in my twenties. I fear the book "came across" to me as too young. My loss, I know!

      Sean

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