Wednesday, 14 June 2017

An Iowan Dinner

SM Stirling, The Scourge Of God (New York, 2009), Chapter Twenty, pp. 487-489.

The concluding chapters are a travelogue of Changed North America. The travellers are dinner guests on an Iowan farm:

a long table;
at one end, a cold, brown-glazed, roast suckling pig, with an apple in its mouth, on a carved oak slab;
at the other end, a sirloin of beef, pink at the centre;
between -
breads;
hot biscuits;
butter;
salads of greens, cherry tomatoes, onions, peppers and radishes with oil and vinegar;
potato salad;
deviled eggs with minced ham forcemeat;
fresh boiled asparagus, cauliflower and eggplant baked with cheese;
sauteed mushrooms;
glazed carrots;
wine;
apple and cherry pies;
walnut ice cream;
after -
pear brandy;
real coffee in silver service and bone-china cups.

4 comments:

Sean M. Brooks said...

Kaor, Paul!

I remember that Iowa farm, or rather, barony. Only hard physical labor could make such Stirlingian banquets safe for us!(Smiles)

Sean

Paul Shackley said...

Sean,
You have caught up with my posts again.
Paul.

Sean M. Brooks said...

Kaor, Paul!

I try! I try to find something to comment about in your blog pieces.

Sean

S.M. Stirling said...

Note that that menu is a very Midwestern one, in turn derived from British, German, and other central-northern European folk cuisines that mutually influenced each other throughout the 19th century as the upper Mississippi Valley was settled. Plus a lot of Amerindian foods (and some ways of preparing them) and things like soybeans from very distant lands.